WISDOM LEADING: The Conversation

Weekly Wisdoms Blog

200 Words for Choice

Dr. Foster Mobley // Business, Quotables, Wisdom Leading

It is said that the indigenous tribes in the Artic Circle have over 200 words for the concept of snow. To an outsider, that seems a little excessive at best, and confusing at worst. But, the value of an important concept in any culture is almost never accurately determined from the outside. Culture is defined as "...the traditional ways of thinking, feeling and reacting shared by a society which help it address its challenges." Think about culture as the stories we tell ourselves about ourselves that define who we are. Culture is important because, while it doesn't necessary determine what happens to us, it heavily shapes the meaning we place on those events, and whether they empower or cripple us. It's not hard for anyone to understand that snow, and all its permutations have very real implications on people in the Arctic regions. Therefore, their culture promotes a deep understanding of, and sensitivity to weather and its nuances of snow. You know what I'd like to see? Our business organizations have placed so much value in the concepts of human development and consciousness (read as "awakenness"), like choice, presence and intentionality that we have 200 words to cover their many aspects and nuances. In many well-intentioned organizations today, uttering those three words get you branded softheaded, na´ve or worse. Wise leaders know otherwise and act accordingly. What is possible when a culture honors and values qualities attributed to the full performance of its people? What do you value through your words and actions?

It is said that the indigenous tribes in the Artic Circle have over 200 words for the concept of snow. To an outsider, that seems a little excessive at best, and confusing at worst. But, the value of an important concept in any culture is almost never accurately determined from the outside.

Culture is defined as "...the traditional ways of thinking, feeling and reacting shared by a society which help it address its challenges." Think about culture as the stories we tell ourselves about ourselves that define who we are. Culture is important because, while it doesn't necessary determine what happens to us, it heavily shapes the meaning we place on those events, and whether they empower or cripple us.

It's not hard for anyone to understand that snow, and all its permutations have very real implications on people in the Arctic regions. Therefore, their culture promotes a deep understanding of, and sensitivity to weather and its nuances of snow.

You know what I'd like to see? Our business organizations have placed so much value in the concepts of human development and consciousness (read as "awakenness"), like choice, presence and intentionality that we have 200 words to cover their many aspects and nuances. In many well-intentioned organizations today, uttering those three words get you branded softheaded, naïve or worse. Wise leaders know otherwise and act accordingly.

What is possible when a culture honors and values qualities attributed to the full performance of its people? What do you value through your words and actions?

0 Comments // Permalink

There are currently no comments for this entry.

These comments are closed.

8.19.13 0
Comments

Search The Blog

Recent Posts

Summer HiatusSpring, Summer, Fall and WinterCosmos and the Forgotten Power of WonderAmazon?s Fire Phone and the Death of ConnectionJune 28th, 1914

Categories

BusinessEducationHistoryQuotablesSportsWisdom Leading

Archives

August 2014July 2014June 2014May 2014April 2014March 2014February 2014January 2014December 2013November 2013October 2013September 2013August 2013July 2013June 2013May 2013April 2013March 2013February 2013January 2013December 2012November 2012October 2012September 2012August 2012July 2012June 2012May 2012April 2012March 2012February 2012January 2012December 2011November 2011October 2011
Return to Blog
Dr. Foster Mobley Blog RSS Feed
 

Dr. Foster Mobley

Trusted advisor and coach to admired executives globally for 3 decades, Thought leader on wisdom-based approaches to breakthrough leading, "Lead Coach" for Deloitte's experienced and high potential leader development, Team performance advisor to two NCAA championship teams