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Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable #3: No Resorts, Please!

Dr. Foster Mobley // Quotables, Wisdom Leading

I've been blessed in my life to travel to many locales around the world. Along the way, I've been out of my comfort zone many times, dealing with unfamiliar languages, customs, and cities. That's one of the most broadening aspects of travel: you're placed in a situation where you have no choice but to deal with your discomfort and grow as a result. Embracing discomfort in business is like traveling to an exotic country with nothing but a backpack and a phrase book. In contrast, you could choose to visit an all-inclusive resort whose grounds you never leave. You might say you visited, say, Croatia, but in fact you stayed on the resort grounds, never spoke the language, and never interacted with the locals. Traveling that way might be more comfortable as you've simply recreated your present existence in a new place, but it doesn't help you grow, truly discover, or connect with new people and new ways of living. In your organization, are you more likely to operate as a backpacker trekking from Kathmandu to New Dehli, or as a guest at a Sandals resort in Jamaica? The less-comfortable option, where you have no choice but to lean in to new situations and learn how other people get things done, leads to new skills and a broader point of view. Consider what kind of travelers your people are-and how you're encouraging them to travel. Whether an explorer or a comfort traveler, what can you be doing more of to model the imperative to grow through challenge?

I've been blessed in my life to travel to many locales around the world. Along the way, I've been out of my comfort zone many times, dealing with unfamiliar languages, customs, and cities. That's one of the most broadening aspects of travel: you're placed in a situation where you have no choice but to deal with your discomfort and grow as a result.

Embracing discomfort in business is like traveling to an exotic country with nothing but a backpack and a phrase book. In contrast, you could choose to visit an all-inclusive resort whose grounds you never leave. You might say you visited, say, Croatia, but in fact you stayed on the resort grounds, never spoke the language, and never interacted with the locals. Traveling that way might be more comfortable as you've simply recreated your present existence in a new place, but it doesn't help you grow, truly discover, or connect with new people and new ways of living.

In your organization, are you more likely to operate as a backpacker trekking from Kathmandu to New Dehli, or as a guest at a Sandals resort in Jamaica? The less-comfortable option, where you have no choice but to lean in to new situations and learn how other people get things done, leads to new skills and a broader point of view. Consider what kind of travelers your people are-and how you're encouraging them to travel.

Whether an explorer or a comfort traveler, what can you be doing more of to model the imperative to grow through challenge?

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Dr. Foster Mobley

Trusted advisor and coach to admired executives globally for 3 decades, Thought leader on wisdom-based approaches to breakthrough leading, "Lead Coach" for Deloitte's experienced and high potential leader development, Team performance advisor to two NCAA championship teams